Henry Hansmann

  • Oscar M. Ruebhausen Professor of Law and Professor of Management
International activities
  • The Anatomy of Corporate Law: A Comparative and Functional Approach (3d edition)
    Switzerland, Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, Japan (2013-2016)
    Research and writing of a third, expanded edition of The Anatomy of Corporate Law: A Comparative and Functional Approach (Oxford University Press, 2d ed., 2009). The fundamental objective of the Anatomy is to provide a common conceptual framework in which students and scholars from around the world can analyze corporate law and discuss the varying approaches that different jurisdictions have taken to the issues involved. To this end, the book pursues an innovative approach to both corporate law and comparative law.

    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, University of Hamburg, University of Hamburg, Oxford University London School of Economics, Oxford University London School of Economics, University of Bologna, University of Bologna, University of Tokyo, University of Tokyo

  • Efficiency of Danish Industrial Foundations
    Denmark (2008-2016)
    The study is to focus on a sample of at least 100 Danish industrial foundations and a matched same-sized sample of investor-owned firms, the latter firms chosen to be similar to the corresponding industrial foundations in industry, size, and age. Earlier small-sample studies have shown little or no performance difference overall. This project is intended to determine if that overall result -- in itself startling -- holds for a larger and more systematic sample. Whether it does or not, the study is also intended to test factors that tend to affect the relative efficiency of industrial foundations. Particular attention will be focused on measures of the "distance" between the operating company and the nonprofit organization that controls it, in the sense of relative independence of the foundation's decision-making from the management of the operating company. The working hypothesis is that the greater this distance, the better the financial performance of the industrial foundation -- that is, the more the industrial foundation acts like a firm seeking to maximize profits for its shareholder-owner(s).

    Copenhagen Business School, Copenhagen Business School